She is an African supermodel who has worked with some of the biggest fashion brands in the world while they are 1 of the coolest newspaper brands in the UK so when British national daily newspaper The Guardian interviewed award-winning supermodel Alek Wek, we immediately knew it was going to be a brilliant feature. Laid back in casual looks, supermodel Alek Wek speaks to The Guardian about fashion, modelling, her humble childhood, the civil war in South Sudan and so much. Interviewed by Sali Hughes for The Guardian, check out a few bits and pieces we took from The Guardian website below

Alek+Wek+Photographed+by+Gustavo+Papaleo+For+The+Guardian+Zen+Magazine+AfricaSupermodel Alek Wek has recently been signed up by Marks &
Spencer for a campaign alongside Emma Thompson,
Annie Lennox and Rita Ora says The Guardian

“High fashion were the brave ones,” says Alek on why it was high fashion designers that embraced her look and not mainstream fashion. “When I started, I’d hear other people saying, ‘God, she’s so bizarre-looking’, because I didn’t look like the girl next door. But I was just normal. I was the girl next door. There were people in high fashion I could better relate to, who were doing something more interesting and not talking this sort of rubbish.”

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Alek explains to Sali about her early childhood and how she had a simple life growing up in South Sudan“We had an extremely simple life. No running water, no electricity. We walked to a well for drinking water, and the loo was a hole in the ground. My mother ran the house, but if we complained about anything, we’d be told to clean it,” she laughs. “It was a tiny town, where everyone knew everyone. We had no idea how poor we were, because we were so rich in our culture, our education. I loved going to school, walking home via the mango trees for a snack.”

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On how she and her family were able to escape the civil war, Alek says it was when things started to get chaotic that her parents decided to tell them the truth and flee the country. “They tried to protect us, but things escalated to such a degree that the militia began fighting the police. Suddenly, neighbours were disappearing mysteriously. You’d go to fetch water and see dead bodies along the way. We all had curfews, we were given regular siren warnings. The police had no resources or ammunition left and, finally, told us to evacuate. There was no accountability. It was chaotic and terrifying.”

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When asked whether modelling was a way of doing something important in the world, Alek says “Yes, absolutely.” “But it wasn’t even about black or white, it was about women. I felt that girls growing up needed to see somebody different, who may have been criticised for their nose, or their hair, or anything – that they could be beautiful. It’s about telling girls from a young age that it’s OK to be quirky, it’s fine to be shy. You don’t have to go with the crowd.”

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For the full interview of Alek Wek in The Guardian, please visit The Guardian

Photograph: Gustavo Papaleo | Styling: Priscilla Kwateng | Photographer’s assistant: Fabian Nordstrom | 
Stylist’s assistants: Genevieve Torabi and Xuxa Milrose | Makeup: Alex Babski at Frank Agency using Lancôme | Hair: Ernesto Montenovo at Phamous using Bumble and bumble | Digital operator: Kelly Mitchell, Republik Agency | Alek Wek is represented by Storm Model Management.

Source: The Guardian
For more details on Alek Wek, connect with her via her Facebook page: Alek Wek’s Journey Home